Member Artists

Nolan Blansit
My r
adfdsfselationship with clay began eight years ago. I took a throwing class with Tea Dhuorg. In short order I bought a wheel, a kiln, a slab roller and any other tools I thought I needed. Even though I was an Art Major in college, I had never found a medium so appealing as clay. 

I throw on the potters wheel and I hand build. Some pieces have elements of both methods. I make mostly functional pieces though some are so exaggerated they will only be used decoratively.??Early on I got into glaze development and through the years I have fired several thousand test tiles. The glazes I use are all from these tests and help to given my work a unique look.??As a studio member at Clay Space I have made friendships with other potters. We seem to inspire each other. I have also taken a couple of classes at Clay Space. There is always something to learn from other potters!

Norelationship with clay began eight years ago. I took a throwing class with Tea Dhuorg. In short order I bought a wheel, a kiln, a slab roller and any other tools I thought I needed. Even though I was an Art Major in college, I had never found a medium so appealing as clay. 

I throw on the potters wheel and I hand build. Some pieces have elements of both methods. I make mostly functional pieces though some are so exaggerated they will only be used decoratively.??Early on I got into glaze development and through the years I have fired several thousand test tiles. The glazes I use are all from these tests and help to given my work a unique look.??As a studio member at Clay Space I have made friendships with other potters. We seem to inspire each other. I have also taken a couple of classes at Clay Space. There is always something to learn from other potters!
My relationship with clay began eight years ago. I took a throwing class with Tea Dhuorg. In short order I bought a wheel, a kiln, a slab roller and any other tools I thought I needed. Even though I was an Art Major in college, I had never found a medium so appealing as clay. 

I throw on the potters wheel and I hand build. Some pieces have elements of both methods. I make mostly functional pieces though some are so exaggerated they will only be used decoratively.??Early on I got into glaze development and through the years I have fired several thousand test tiles. The glazes I use are all from these tests and help to given my work a unique look.??As a studio member at Clay Space I have made friendships with other potters. We seem to inspire each other. I have also taken a couple of classes at Clay Space. There is always something to learn from other potters!
My relationship with clay began in 2004. I took a throwing class with Tea Dhuorg. In short order, I bought a wheel, a kiln, a slab roller and any other tools I thought 
I needed. Even though I was an Art Major in college, I had never found a medium so appealing as clay.

I throw on the potters wheel and I hand-build. Some pieces have elements of both methods. I make mostly functional pieces though some are so exaggerated they will only be used decoratively.

Early on, I got into glaze development and through the years I have fired several thousand test tiles. The glazes I use are all from these tests and help to give my work a unique look.

As a studio member at Clay Space, I have made friendships with other potters. We seem to inspire each other. I have also taken a couple of classes at Clay Space. There is always something to learn from others potters!
Shannon Hardin

I have been a creative person my whole life. I took every art class that was offered in high school, but never even thought about making jewelry. My house is a testament to my creativity. I know that I drive my family crazy with all the bright colors and art collections all through the house.

While looking for work in 2005, I realized that I needed to do something creative to occupy my time after days of sending out resumes and scheduling interviews. I had a friend show me how to do basic wire work and the rest is, as they say, history!

Finding the hobby to fill my time has taken on a new meaning. I have fallen in love with the whole process of jewelry making from start to finish. Viewing the colors and handling the materials feed my creative passion. Designing a piece of jewelry, no matter how simple or complicated, is a huge joy. I get excited just thinking about going to a bead shop or show.

I use primarily glass beads, fresh water pearls, silver, silver-plate and copper. My one-of-a-kind bracelets, necklaces and earrings are as much fun to make as they are to wear. I enjoy teaching others how to make jewelry and continue to learn new techniques through my exploration of books, magazines and online tutorials.

(Shannon has been offering jewelry workshops through Clay Space for the 
past 3 years.)
Damon Harris

Damon Harris has been working as an artist at Clay Space over the past four years. He received his MFA from University of Oregon in 2009 following a BFA at Murray State University in Kentucky in 2005. Currently, he is working at Clay Space with Jim and Josh on the clay press production project.

His immediate interest has been in producing a vast number of pyramid shaped ceramic pieces (count 300 here!) that will form the main components of an installation at The Wave Gallery, 547 Blair Street.

The exhibit opens on Friday, June 7th, 2013 from 7-9pm and continues through June.

The following is from Damon's artist statement:

Watching the television footage of NASA's Curiosity Rover land on the surface of Mars, I was reminded how the most highly advanced man-made objects, designed to operate at the very edge of what is possible or knowable, look particularly exposed and vulnerable despite their mind boggling complexity. I see a parallel between unwieldy milestones of scientific advancement and the fragile, makeshift shelters I built as a child, using natural or discarded materials found in the woods surrounding my parents’ house. Both feel like attempts to simultaneously engage in and be insulated from that which is physically and conceptually uncharted.

Bonnie King

I love the feeling of clay and love that it can take so many different forms. I like to envision my creations in gardens or on porches with pretty plants surrounding them.

I have always enjoyed playing in dirt, making mud pies, gardening and shaping clay. Clay is so forgiving, it doesn't complain when you pound the heck out of it, if a piece doesn't work, you can squish the clay back down to a lump and start again.

Like planting a seed and watching a flower emerge, there is something magical about seeing a piece come out of the kiln. First you have the uniformed clay, then you mold and glaze it to your vision and then there is the firing. Sometimes the end result is a happy accident. In either case, transforming a lump of clay into a mask, pot or vase gives me great joy.

Bonnie King has been working with clay since the 1970s. She has taken ceramic classes at Eastern Oregon State College, Blue Mountain Community College and Lane Community College. Even when she was getting her nursing degree and raising her two daughters, she found time to work with clay anywhere she could - in the basement, garage or at the kitchen table.

It was a happy day in 2009 when Ms. King discovered Clay Space. With the encouragement and help of Ellen Davidson, Jim Laub, Josh Allen and the community of potters at Clay Space, she has found a supportive place for expressing her ideas.





Nolan Blansit
Shannon Hardin
Damon Harris





Bonnie King